Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design
Vintage art deco floor standing ashtray, teak and chrome, Ianthe made in England, stylish retro design

Vintage art deco Lanthe floor standing ashtray

Regular price
£95.00 GBP
Sale price
£95.00 GBP
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Stunning vintage art deco standing ashtray created by Ianthe, made in England. This amazing form features a vibrant chrome base and lid with a strip connected throughout the teak. The base has a pull-in mechanism to dispose of your cigarettes, and the top comes off to tip out the waste once it is full. The vivid teak centre has a warm sheen, and the piece is in an atomic-style conical shape.

Elegant style that makes for a stylish ashtray design for your interior.
Excellent vintage condition with minimal signs of authentic patina.

Height: 39cm
Length: 17cm
Width: 17cm

Ianthe was a company owned by Mr Ian Heath, who resided in Birmingham. His company made silver plate and metal cast fire irons, which were exported and sold in the UK.

Ian Heath Ltd began manufacturing in Birmingham in 1952, and although the firm manufactured through the 1950s–1960s, manufacture began to slow and eventually appears to have ceased altogether by the 1970s