Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece
Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece
Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece
Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece
Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece
Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece
Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece
Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece

Vintage ray ban advertising mirror, sunglasses, shop display, picture, American - Italian, collectible piece

Regular price
£195.00 GBP
Sale price
£195.00 GBP
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Vintage ray ban advertising mirrors, sunglasses, shop displays, pictures, American - Italian, collectable pieces.

Stunning vintage ray ban mirror, likely to have been used as a shop display, with the famous branding moulded into the design with the metal backplate in a vivid red tone to impact your interior design.

Excellent vintage condition with minimal signs of authentic patina.

Height: 38cm
Length: 25cm
Width: 2cm

Ray-Ban is an American-Italian luxury sunglasses and eyeglasses brand created in 1936 by Bausch & Lomb. The brand is known for its Wayfarer and Aviator lines of sunglasses.

In 1929, US Army Air Corps Colonel John A. Macready worked with Bausch & Lomb, a Rochester, New York-based medical equipment manufacturer, to create aviation sunglasses that would reduce the distraction for pilots caused by the intense blue and white hues of the sky.

Specifically, MacCready was concerned that pilots’ goggles would fog up, significantly reducing visibility at high altitudes. The prototype, created in 1936 and known as “Anti-Glare”, had plastic frames and green lenses that could cut out the glare without obscuring vision. The name “Ray-Ban” was hence derived from the ability of these glasses to limit the ingress of either ultraviolet or infrared rays of light.