Excellent vintage Pierrot decorative mirror showing a stunning design in various panels in cream and grey with a vivid red rose in an out finish; the face had magnificent intricate detail with a thoughtful finish with a hint of red in the lips.
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable
Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable

Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable

Regular price
£95.00 GBP
Sale price
£95.00 GBP
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Tax included. Shipping calculated at checkout.

Vintage stained glass Pierrot and rose mirror, decorative picture, clown art, collectable

Excellent vintage Pierrot decorative mirror showing a stunning design in various panels in cream and grey with a vivid red rose in an out finish; the face had magnificent intricate detail with a thoughtful finish with a hint of red in the lips.

Mid-coloured sleek frame.

Excellent vintage condition with minimal signs of patina.

Height: 34cm
Length: 29cm
Width: 2cm

The origins of the pierrot character come from the medieval Italian Comedy or Commedia d'ell Arte, as do those of Harlequin & Columbine, whom we associate with pantomime and Mr Punch of Punch & Judy fame.

Pierrot's character developed from being a buffoon to an avatar of the disenfranchised. Many cultural movements found him amenable to their respective causes: Decadents turned him into a disillusioned foe of idealism; Symbolists saw him as a lonely fellow sufferer; Modernists made him a silent, alienated observer of the mysteries of the human condition. Much of that mythic quality ("I'm Pierrot," said David Bowie: "I'm Everyman") still adheres to the "sad clown" in the postmodern era.