Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror
Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror

Stylish art nouveau Harlene for the hair mirror, hair tonic, collectible, advertising sign, picture mirror

Regular price
£395.00 GBP
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£395.00 GBP
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Vintage Harlene for the hair mirror.

Stunning collectable advertising piece.

Stunning hair tonic piece, the original company was founded in the early 1900s in the Victorian times.

Stylish, elegant, flowing design with a vibrant picture of an elegant lady and a selection of beautiful writing in bright tones show the branding design.

This advertising mirror comes In a sleek aluminium frame, in excellent vintage condition with minimal signs of authentic patina.

Please visit our shop for wonderful decorative pieces.

Reuben Goldstein (c. 1862 – 1 December 1943), who later changed his name to Reuben Goldstein Edwards and subsequently Reuben George Edwards, was the proprietor of Edwards’ Harlene, a manufacturer of hair restorers, colourants and other hair products for both men and women, from which he made a fortune. Goldstein and his wife founded and helped fund Edith Edward’s tuberculosis Preventorium at Papworth Hospital.

By the mid-1880s, Goldstein had founded the Edwards’ Harlene Co., manufacturers of hair products, initially at 5 New Oxford Street and by late 1891 at 95 and 96 High Holborn, London.[4] Harlene products were promoted through large pictorial newspaper advertisements that made extravagant claims.[5][6] One shows a drawing of a man with impossibly luxuriant dark hair, beard and handlebar moustache, and a woman with long flowing curly locks, claiming “Edwards’ Harlene positively forces luxuriant hair, whiskers and moustachios to grow heavily within a few weeks without injury to the skin no matter what the age—the world-renowned remedy for baldness, from whatever cause arising. As a producer of whiskers and moustachios, it has never been equalled. It never fails as a curer for weak or thin eyelashes or restoring grey hair to its original colour.

High-society Victorian women went for natural beauty regarding cosmetics to appear pure and youthful; however, there was a need for hair treatments and products that sustained intricate hairstyles. For many cultures, a woman’s hair expresses femininity, and Victorian women were no exception. Many nineteenth-century photographs show women with extremely long hair. The length of the hair, in particular, displayed a woman’s health and was well taken care of. Both men and women used products to promote hair growth. Since the use of cosmetics on societal women was limited, hair was kept well groomed. Victorian women would braid their hair, use wigs, and apply heat to make tight curls. The Victorian era was a period in which it was more possible for women to focus on personal hygiene than it was in previous generations.

Height: 78cm
Length: 57cm
Width: 2cm