Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical
Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical

Vintage The General train advertising mirror, usa railroad, locomotive sign, steam and coal, tracks, collectable, Americana, historical

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£75.00 GBP
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£75.00 GBP
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Wonderful The General locomotive advertising mirror featuring the historic US railroad train with intricate picture of the loco, bold fonts in a forest green tones with a Victorian style border in great detail.

Dark coloured wooden frame.

It comes in vintage condition with a few signs of authentic patina.

Height: 23cm
Length: 32cm
Width: 2cm

Western & Atlantic Railroad General is a 4-4-0 "American" type steam locomotive built in 1855 by the Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor in Paterson, New Jersey for the Western & Atlantic Railroad, best known as the engine stolen by Union spies in the Great Locomotive Chase, an attempt to cripple the Confederate rail network during the American Civil War. Today, the locomotive is preserved at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History in Kennesaw, Georgia, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The General provided freight and passenger service between Atlanta, Georgia, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, before the Civil War on the Western and Atlantic Railroad of the State of Georgia and later, the Western and Atlantic Railroad Company.

During the Civil War on April 12, 1862, The General was commandeered by Northerners led by James J. Andrews at Big Shanty (now Kennesaw, Georgia), and abandoned north of Ringgold, after being pursued by William Allen Fuller and the Texas. Low on water and wood, the General eventually lost steam pressure and speed, and slowed to a halt two miles north of Ringgold, where Andrews and his raiders abandoned the locomotive and tried to flee.

It had been speculated by some that, after the General had been damaged, the invading Union army restored the engine and operated it. However, many historians believe that the engine was left untouched for the remainder of the war. The Union army had based its repair shops in Nashville, and there is no evidence to suggest the engine was moved there. The United States Military Railroad Service had many new or like-new engines, so they had no need to restore captured ones such as the General. The USMRR had often left the damaged equipment of a captured railroad undisturbed, and its records, having listed the General as "captured and returned," further suggest such was the case of the General.

After the war ended, the General was repaired and continued service on the Western and Atlantic. In the 1870s, the General was completely rebuilt, it had received a new pilot, boiler, and other components. Most notably, its three dome configuration was reduced to two domes, and its Radley-Hunter style balloon stack was replaced with a diamond stack, as the engine had been converted to burn coal. Indeed, the rebuilt engine had little resemblance to its original form.